UNIPORTAL VIDEO-ASSISTED THORACIC SURGERY ANATOMICAL RESECTIONS – DOES PREVIOUS TOBACCO EXPOSURE ADVERSELY INFLUENCE POST-OPERATIVE OUTCOMES?

Authors

  • Joana Rei Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
  • Susana Lareiro Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
  • Pedro Fernandes Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
  • Miguel Guerra Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal; Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, Oporto, Portugal
  • José Miranda Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal
  • Luís Vouga Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho-EPE, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.48729/pjctvs.125

Abstract

A high percentage of patients presenting for lung surgery are either current or former smokers, which is typically associated with many anatomical and physiological pulmonary changes. The influence of tobacco on postoperative pulmonary complications remains controversial. The main goal of this study was to analyse the effects of smoking on the risk of post-operative complications and morbidity in patients submitted to lung resection surgery through uniportal VATS.

Peri-operative data on all cases of anatomical lung resection surgery through single-port VATS performed between December 2013 and July 2018 at three Portuguese institutions were collected and retrospectively reviewed Demographic data, diagnosis, pre-operative lung function tests, in-hospital length of stay (LOS) and intra and post-operative drainage levels were registered. Patients were divided in two groups according to tobacco exposure. Post-operative complications and morbidity were compared through statistical analysis.

We performed 313 procedures, 303 of which were evaluated in regard to outcome. Mean age at time of surgery was of 62,85 years (SD=12,24). One hundred and sixty patients (52,81%) had a history of tobacco use, while 47,19% (n=143) had never smoked. Non-smokers had significantly better lung function than smokers (p<0,05). Smoking history showed a contribution to post-operative prolonged air leaks (p=0,025) morbidity (p=0,05), 2-day longer LOS (μ=5,36 days vs. μ =7,53 days; p<0,05), longer operative times and higher intra and post-operative drainage levels.

A history of smoking during a patient’s life negatively impacts morbidity in patients submitted to uniportal VATS for anatomical lung resection, increasing early post-operative complications and prolonging in-hospital stays.

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Published

26-05-2021

How to Cite

1.
Rei J, Lareiro S, Fernandes P, Guerra M, Miranda J, Vouga L. UNIPORTAL VIDEO-ASSISTED THORACIC SURGERY ANATOMICAL RESECTIONS – DOES PREVIOUS TOBACCO EXPOSURE ADVERSELY INFLUENCE POST-OPERATIVE OUTCOMES?. Rev Port Cir Cardiotorac Vasc [Internet]. 2021 May 26 [cited 2023 Feb. 3];26(2):121-5. Available from: https://pjctvs.com/index.php/journal/article/view/125

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