Endoscopic Vein Harvesting – How Do We Do It?

Authors

  • Paulo Veiga Oliveira Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Santa Cruz Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8360-1714
  • Márcio Madeira Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Santa Cruz Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal
  • Inês Alves Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Santa Cruz Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal
  • Sara Ranchordás Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Santa Cruz Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal
  • José Pedro Neves Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Santa Cruz Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.48729/pjctvs.425

Abstract

The saphenous vein graft (SVG) remains the most used conduit as a second graft in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG).1 Traditionally, surgeons harvest SVG with an open approach, making a long incision along the medial part of the leg or thigh. This procedure can potentially result in important complications, such as delayed wound healing, postoperative pain and infection.2 Thus, less invasive techniques for vessel harvesting have grown in popularity. Endoscopic vein harvesting (EVH) is a minimally invasive harvesting procedure, which only requires a short incision, leading to less wound complications and a faster return to normal daily activities.

This article intends to describe how we do EVH technique in our centre, from the preparation of the patient to the postoperative period and share some tips and tricks from our experience.

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References

Alexander JH, Smith PK. Coronary-artery bypass grafting. N Engl J Med 2016;374:1954–64.

Ferdinand FD, MacDonald JK, Balkhy HH, Bisleri G, Hwang HY, Northrup P et al. Endoscopic conduit harvest in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: an ISMICS systematic review and consensus conference statements. Innovations (Phila) 2017;12:301–19.

Athanasiou T, Aziz O, Skapinakis P, Perunovic B, Hart J, et al. Leg wound infection after coronary artery bypass grafting: a meta-analysis comparing minimally invasive versus conventional vein harvesting. Ann Thorac Surg. 2003 Dec;76(6):2141-6. doi: 10.1016/s0003-4975(03)01435-8.

Krishnamoorthy B, Critchley WR, Venkateswaran RV, et al. A comprehensive review on learning curve associated problems in endoscopic vein harvesting and the requirement for a standardised training programme. J Cardiothorac Surg 2016;11:45.

Siddiqui S, Whooley J, Miceli A, Bartolozzi F, Soo A. Endoscopic vein harvesting: a guide for approaching difficult cases and assessing patients preoperatively. Interact CardioVasc Thorac Surg 2022; doi:10.1093/icvts/ivac142

Diepen SV, Brennan JM, Hafley GE, Reyes EM, Allen KB, et al. Endoscopic harvesting device type and outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Ann Surg. 2014 Aug;260(2):402-8.

Mahmood D, Rosati F, Petsikas D, Payne D, Torkan L, Bisleri G. Endoscopic saphenous vein harvesting with a non-sealed approach. Multimed Man Cardiothorac Surg. 2019 Apr 09;2019.

Akowuah E, Burns D, Zacharias J, Kirmani BH. Endoscopic vein harvesting. J Thorac Dis 2021;13(3):1899-1908. doi: 10.21037/jtd-20-1819

Raja SG, Sarang Z. Endoscopic vein harvesting: technique, outcomes, concerns & controversies. J Thorac Dis. 2013 Nov;5 Suppl 6(Suppl 6):S630-7. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2013.10.01.

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Published

07-07-2024

How to Cite

1.
Veiga Oliveira P, Madeira M, Alves I, Ranchordás S, Pedro Neves J. Endoscopic Vein Harvesting – How Do We Do It?. Rev Port Cir Cardiotorac Vasc [Internet]. 2024 Jul. 7 [cited 2024 Jul. 18];31(2):11-6. Available from: https://pjctvs.com/index.php/journal/article/view/425

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